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Juventus History- All about the Club

The football club known as Juventus has a history that spans over a century. Juventus history is rich, with its origin dating back to 1897 when it was founded by a group of Turinese students as an athletics club.

The team has since become a force to reckon with in the Italian football league system. The name Juventus, meaning ‘youth’ in Latin, aptly reflects the club’s youthful energy and enthusiasm that has remained steadfast throughout its journey.

Juventus history is replete with remarkable achievements, including 36 official league titles, 14 Coppa Italia titles, and nine Supercoppa Italiana titles. The club also holds the record for the most wins in these competitions.

In addition to their national triumphs, Juventus has also made a mark on the international stage, winning two Intercontinental Cups, two UEFA Champions Leagues, and one UEFA Cup Winners’ Cup.

Their achievements have led to the team being ranked sixth in Europe and twelfth in the world for the most confederation titles won, with eleven trophies. The team’s success has also been recognized by the Federazione Italiana Giuoco Calcio (FIGC) classification, where Juventus leads the historical ranking.

Juventus History

There are a number of things to be covered in this article, subjects like Juventus badge history, Juventus Champions league history, Juventus kit history, Juventus logo history, Juventus jersey history, Juventus honors, Juventus trophies history, Juventus mascot history, Juventus stadiums, Juventus rivalries history, and Juventus managers history. We will talk about all these so that you can get a clear image of the club in your mind.

The Founding, 1897 to 1918

The Founding, 1897 to 1918
credit: juventus.com

In Juventus history, a group of pupils from Massimo d’Azeglio Lyceum school founded Sport-Club Juventus in 1897, and it was later renamed to Foot-Ball Club Juventus two years later.

They joined the Italian Football Championship in 1900, with their first match being a 1-0 loss against Torinese on March 11th of that year. In 1904, Juventus’ finances were revived by Marco Ajmone-Marsan, allowing them to move their training field to Velodrome Umberto I and wearing a pink and black kit.

By 1905, they had won their first Italian Football Championship while playing at the same venue, with the team colors changing to black and white stripes that were inspired by Notts County.

A split occurred in the club in 1906 due to some staff wanting to relocate Juve out of Turin, but the team survived the First World War and spent the period after the split rebuilding steadily. Alfred Dick, the club’s president, was displeased with the situation and left with several key players to establish FBC Torino, which went on to spawn the Derby della Mole.

Dominance, 1923 to 1980

Dominance, 1923 to 1980
credit: wikipedia

Edoardo Agnelli, who served as the vice president of FIAT, assumed the presidency of Juventus in 1923, and a newly constructed stadium was opened the following year. This development contributed to the team’s triumph in their second league championship during the 1925-26 season.

Juventus emerged as a significant contender in Italian football from the 1930s, clinching a record five consecutive Italian football championships and playing a pivotal part in establishing the Italy national football team during the Vittorio Pozzo era, which included their victory in the 1934 FIFA World Cup with esteemed players like Raimundo Orsi, Luigi Bertolini, Giovanni Ferrari, and Luis Monti. At present, Juventus boasts the most FIFA World Cup champions at 27 as of 2023.

After World War II, Gianni Agnelli succeeded as Juventus president, and the club won two more league championships in the late 1940s and early 1950s. In the 1957-58 season, Juventus recruited two new strikers, Welshman John Charles, and Italian Argentine Omar Sivori, to complement long-standing member Giampiero Boniperti.

In 1959-60, Juventus achieved their first league and cup double by defeating Fiorentina. Boniperti retired in 1961 as the club’s all-time leading scorer with 182 goals across all competitions.

In the remaining part of the decade, Juventus only secured the 1966-67 Serie A championship. However, the 1970s in Juventus history saw them cement their position in Italian football with back-to-back Scudetto wins under Cestmir Vycpalek.

The team clinched three more league titles in the decade, with defender Gaetano Scirea making significant contributions. The latter two victories were achieved under the leadership of Giovanni Trapattoni, who also steered Juventus to their inaugural major European title, the 1976-77 UEFA Cup, and sustained the team’s dominance in the early 1980s.

Another Star on the Badge, 1980 to 1993

Another Star on the Badge, 1980 to 1993
credit: twitter

Juventus history during the 1980s was marked by significant achievements, including winning the league title three more times by 1984, enabling the club to add a second golden star to their shirt, and having their players gain significant recognition, with Paolo Rossi and Michel Platini winning the European Footballer of the Year award.

Juventus also became the first club to have players win the award for four consecutive years and the first club in the history of European football to have won all three major UEFA competitions. However, the rest of the 1980s were not as successful for Juventus, with A.C. Milan and Inter Milan winning Italian championships.

The club did manage to win the Coppa Italia and the UEFA Cup final in 1989-90 under the guidance of Dino Zoff and move to a new stadium, the Stadio delle Alpi, in 1990. Nonetheless, the early 1990s saw little success for Juventus under Luigi Maifredi and Trapattoni, with the club only managing to win the 1993 UEFA Cup final.

Lippi Era, 1994 to 2004

Lippi Era, 1994 to 2004
credit: twitter

Marcello Lippi became the manager of Juventus at the start of the 1994-1995 Serie A season, leading the team to their first Serie A championship since the mid-1980s and a Coppa Italia final. Players such as Ferrara, Baggio, Vialli, and Del Piero were part of the team during this successful period in Juventus history.

Regarding Juventus Champions league history, Lippi guided the team to victories in the 1995 Supercoppa Italiana and the 1995-96 UEFA Champions League, with Ravanelli scoring in a 1-1 draw against Ajax. The addition of notable players like Zidane, Inzaghi, and Davids resulted in further successes for the team, including back-to-back Serie A titles, the 1996 UEFA Super Cup, and the 1996 Intercontinental Cup.

Although they reached two consecutive Champions League finals, they lost to Borussia Dortmund and Real Madrid in 1997 and 1998, respectively. Lippi returned to Juventus in 2001 and signed big-name players like Buffon, Trezeguet, Nedved, and Thuram, leading the team to their first Serie A championship since 1998 in the 2001-2002 season.

The team also participated in the 2003 all-Italian UEFA Champions League final but lost to Milan on penalties. Lippi’s successful managerial tenure with Juventus came to an end when he was appointed head coach of the Italian national team.

Scandal and Relegation, 2004 to 2007

Scandal and Relegation, 2004 to 2007
credit: eurosport.com

Fabio Capello became the coach of Juventus in 2004 and led the club to two consecutive first-place finishes in Serie A. However, in 2006, Juventus history and reputation were damaged due to the implication that they were involved in the Calciopoli scandal along with four other clubs.

As a result, Juventus was relegated to Serie B for the first time in their history and stripped of their 2004-05 Serie A title. The 2005-06 title was later awarded to Inter Milan.

The scandal led to the departure of many key players from Juventus, including Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Fabio Cannavaro, and Gianluca Zambrotta. However, some players such as Alessandro Del Piero, Gianluigi Buffon, and Giorgio Chiellini remained with the club to help them return to Serie A, which they achieved by winning the Serie B championship in the 2006-07 season.

Since then, Juventus has considered challenging the stripping of their 2006 scudetto and the non-assignment of the 2005 title, depending on the outcome of the Calciopoli trials. The club even sued the Italian Football Federation (FIGC) for damages caused by their relegation.

In Juventus managers history, in 2015, the Supreme Court released a 150-page document that confirmed former general manager Luciano Moggi’s involvement in the scandal and the intention to favor Juventus.

However, the court did not thoroughly investigate the involvement of other clubs and executives in the scandal. Moggi and Giraudo appealed to the European Court of Human Rights, but Juventus’ appeals were declared inadmissible.

Poor Results, 2007 to 2011

Poor Results, 2007 to 2011
credit: eurosport.com

Juventus history saw them appoint Claudio Ranieri as manager after their comeback for the 2007-08 Serie A season. They finished third in their first season back and qualified for the UEFA Champions League’s third qualifying round. Despite beating Real Madrid in the group stages, they were knocked out by Chelsea in the knockout round.

Ranieri was sacked after a series of poor results, and Ciro Ferrara took over temporarily for the last two games of the 2008-09 season before being named manager for the 2009-10 season. However, Ferrara’s stint was unsuccessful as Juventus were knocked out of the UEFA Champions League and Coppa Italia and finished sixth in the league by January 2010.

Alberto Zaccheroni was named as caretaker manager but couldn’t help the team improve, as they finished the season in seventh place. In 2010-11, Andrea Agnelli became the club’s president and replaced Zaccheroni and director of sport Alessio Secco with Luigi Delneri and Giuseppe Marotta.

Delneri was unable to improve their fortunes and was replaced by Antonio Conte, a former player and fan favorite, who had just won promotion with Siena. In September 2011, Juventus moved to the new Juventus Stadium, now known as the Allianz Stadium.

A Remarkable Comeback, 2011 to 2020

A Remarkable Comeback, 2011 to 2020
credit: bleacherreport.com

Juventus history is filled with remarkable achievements, one of which includes being the first team to go unbeaten in the 38-game format during the 2011-12 Serie A season under Conte’s management.

The team went on to win the title after beating Cagliari 2-0 and Milan losing to Inter 4-2. In the 2013-14 Serie A season, Juventus won their 30th official league championship and achieved a record 102 points and 33 wins, marking their third consecutive scudetto.

With Allegri as the new manager in the 2014-15 Serie A season, Juventus won their 31st official title and achieved a record tenth Coppa Italia, securing the domestic double. They also reached the 2015 UEFA Champions League final but lost to Barcelona 3-1.

In the following seasons, Juventus continued their winning streak by securing multiple Serie A and Coppa Italia titles. In the 2019-20 season, they reached an unprecedented milestone by winning their ninth consecutive league title.

A Steep Decline, 2020 to Present

A Steep Decline, 2020 to Present
credit: juventus.com

The recent events in Juventus history have been marked by a series of changes and challenges. In 2020, the club replaced coach Maurizio Sarri with former player Andrea Pirlo, who won the Supercoppa Italiana in January 2021 but failed to continue Juventus’ run of nine consecutive titles in the Serie A.

Pirlo was then sacked in May 2021, and Massimiliano Allegri returned as manager. In 2022, Juventus suffered their first trophyless season in over a decade after losing to Inter Milan in the Coppa Italia final.

More recently, the entire board of directors resigned in November 2022, and the club was deducted 15 points for capital gain violations related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Juventus supporters have protested against the penalty, with some even canceling their subscriptions to sports channels. Despite these challenges, the club continues to strive for success in the future.

Juventus Jersey History

Juventus Jersey History
credit: the18.com

Juventus has been recognized for its iconic black and white striped jerseys, along with white or black shorts, which have been a part of the club’s identity for more than a century, tracing back to 1903. Their original uniform was comprised of pink shirts and black ties, which were handmade by the father of one of the players.

However, the shirts would fade after washing, prompting the club to search for a new solution. They turned to English team member John Savage, who was asked if he knew of any sources in England that could provide more durable shirts.

Savage’s friend, a Notts County supporter based in Nottingham, shipped over the now-iconic black and white striped shirts that have since become a fixture of Juventus’s identity. These colors are viewed as symbols of power and aggression and are an integral part of Juventus history.

Juventus Badge History

Juventus Emblem History
credit: change.org

Juventus’ badge has undergone minor changes since the 1920s. The most recent change occurred in 2004 when the team’s emblem was transformed into a black-and-white oval shield that resembles the one used by Italian ecclesiastics.

The shield is divided into five vertical stripes, two white and three black, and features a white convex section with the name of the club superimposed over a golden curvature.

In the lower section, a black silhouette of a charging bull is featured on a black old French shield, with a black silhouette of a mural crown above the black spherical triangle’s base. These symbols pay homage to the club’s roots and cultural heritage.

However, in January 2017, Juventus’ president announced that the badge would be changed to a logotype consisting of a stylized Black and White “J,” which reflects “the Juventus way of living.”

Juventus was the first team to adopt a star as a symbol of their competition’s triumph and added one above their badge in 1958 to represent their tenth Italian Football Championship and Serie A title.

Over time, this practice has become popularized with other clubs as well. The club’s emblem has also undergone changes in the past, with the convex section being blue and concave, the old French shield and the mural crown being larger, and the emblem featuring two “Golden Stars for Sport Excellence” above the convex and concave section.

In the 1980s, the emblem featured the blurred silhouette of a zebra with two golden stars and the club’s name forming an arc above. All of these modifications reflect Juventus history and the evolution of the club’s identity over time.

Juventus Songs and Documentaries

Juventus Songs and Documentaries
credit: amazon.com

The official song of Juventus, called Juve (story of a great love) in English, was written by Alessandra Torre and Claudio Guidetti, and was performed by Paolo Belli in 2007. In 2016, the La Villa brothers produced a documentary film titled Black and White Stripes: The Juventus Story, which explored the club’s history.

In 2018, Netflix released a docu-series called First Team: Juventus, which followed the team during the season, both on and off the field. This series gave fans a behind-the-scenes look at the players and the club’s inner workings.

Amazon Prime released an eight-episode docu-series called All or Nothing: Juventus on November 25th, 2021, which followed the club’s journey throughout the season and provided an intimate look at the team’s activities both on and off the field.

These various productions demonstrate the significant place that Juventus history holds in the hearts of fans and enthusiasts alike.

Juventus Stadiums

Juventus Stadiums
credit: Juventus.com

Juventus initially played their matches in the Parco del Valentino and Parco Cittadella during their first two years of existence (1897 and 1898). Afterward, they moved to Piazza d’Armi Stadium and played there until 1908, except for 1905 and 1906, when they played at Corso Re Umberto. From 1909 to 1922, Juventus played their home games at Corso Sebastopoli Camp and later at Corso Marsiglia Camp until 1933, where they won four league titles.

Then, they moved to Stadio Benito Mussolini in 1934, which was renamed Stadio Comunale Vittorio Pozzo after World War II. Juventus played their home games at this stadium for 57 years, a total of 890 league matches, and continued to host training sessions there until July 2003.

From 1990 to 2006, they played their home games at Stadio delle Alpi, except for rare occasions when they played at other stadiums such as Renzo Barbera, Dino Manuzzi, and Stadio Giuseppe Meazza.

In August 2006, Juventus returned to Stadio Comunale, which was renamed Stadio Olimpico. However, in November 2008, the club announced plans to build a new stadium, the Juventus Stadium, on the site of delle Alpi. Construction began in 2009 and was completed in 2011, just in time for the start of the 2011-12 season.

The stadium has a capacity of 41,507 and does not have a running track. It has been known commercially as the Allianz Stadium of Turin since July 1st, 2017, and will keep that name until June 30th, 2030.

Juventus Fan Base

Juventus Fan Base
credit: Juventus.com

With more than 12 million tifosi or fans, representing around 34% of Italian football supporters, Juventus is the most popular football club in Italy, as well as being one of the most supported football clubs worldwide, with over 440 million supporters, particularly in Mediterranean countries where many Italian diaspora have migrated.

This historical football club boasts a vast number of fan club branches spread globally, and demand for Juventus tickets is high, especially for occasional home games held away from Turin, suggesting the team has more support in other regions of the country.

Juventus has a massive following throughout mainland Southern Italy, Sicily, and Malta, making the team one of the most followed teams in away matches, surpassing even Turin’s support.

Feel free to read our article about PSG’s history as well.

Juventus Rivalries History

Juventus Competitors
credit: forzaitalianfootball.com

In Juventus history, the club has developed significant rivalries with two main clubs. One is fellow Turin club Torino, with whom matches are known as the Derby della Mole (Turin Derby). This rivalry dates back to 1906 when Torino was founded by break-away Juventus players and staff.

Another high-profile rivalry is with Inter, a big Serie A club located in Milan, the capital of the neighboring region of Lombardy. Matches between these two clubs are referred to as the Derby d’Italia (Derby of Italy), and they regularly challenge each other at the top of the league table, intensifying the rivalry.

Until the Calciopoli scandal, which saw Juventus forcibly relegated, the two were the only Italian clubs to have never played below Serie A. This rivalry has intensified since the later part of the 1990s, reaching its highest levels ever post-Calciopoli, with the return of Juventus to Serie A.

Juventus also had a rivalry with AC Milan, a prominent team in Italy. This challenge confronts two of the clubs with the greatest basin of supporters as well as those with the greatest turnover and stock market value in the country.

Match-ups between Milan and Juventus are regarded as the championship of Serie A, and both teams often fight for the top positions of the standings, sometimes even deciding the award of the title. The club also has rivalries with Roma, Fiorentina, and Napoli.

Damian Cade
Damian Cade
He is an enthusiastic senior writer for Footbalium who leans towards writing and researching the history of football clubs and players' life stories.
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